The Institute of Maritime History (IMH) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and documentation of archaeological remains related to maritime history. Incorporated in 1995 and based in Tall Timbers, Maryland, IMH is engaged in the study and conservation of shipwrecks, historic waterfront structures and landscapes, and submerged prehistoric archaeological sites. Through archaeological research, IMH seeks to inform and engage the public about the history and culture of seafaring, marine industries, and traditional maritime lifeways.

SHIP: Submerged Historical Inventory Project

SHIP Sonar Image: A sonar image of a wooden shipwreck in Maryland waters.SHIP Sonar Image: A sonar image of a wooden shipwreck in Maryland waters.The Institute of Maritime History is conducting a multi-state project for State Historic Preservation Officers (SHPOs), using volunteer divers and researchers to scout for shipwrecks, assess them, gather archival data, and report their findings.

Seal Cove Shipwreck Project

Figure 1: Seal Cove Shipwreck Site Plan.Figure 1: Seal Cove Shipwreck Site Plan.The Seal Cove Shipwreck Project, funded by the National Park Service’s Submerged Resources Center and the Institute for Maritime History, recorded archaeologically a historic wooden shipwreck on Mount Desert Island, Maine. Situated in the inter-tidal zone on Acadia National Park easement land owned by the Town of Tremont, the wreck was surveyed between July 30 and August 6, 2011.

IMH and the U.S. Marine Corps Base Quantico Receive ACHP Award for 'Achievement in Historic Preservation'

ACHP historic preservation award.ACHP historic preservation award.In May 2011, IMH was honored with a historic preservation award from the U.S. President's Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), as one of the partners who is working with the U.S. Marine Corps Base Quantico to document archaeological sites associated with three Civil War Confederate camps and the CSS George Page, a side-wheel steamship.

Submerged Prehistoric Landscape Survey in Blue Hill Bay, Maine

Prehistoric stone biface: The Lunt biface (ca. 9,000 years old) recovered by scallop fishermen in Blue Hill Bay, Maine in the 1990s.Prehistoric stone biface: The Lunt biface (ca. 9,000 years old) recovered by scallop fishermen in Blue Hill Bay, Maine in the 1990s.In 2007-2008, IMH participated in a 2-year submerged prehistoric landscape survey in Maine under the direction of Stefan Claesson and the University of New Hampshire (UNH). Supported by a grant from NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, the survey explored a region of Blue Hill Bay, Maine for the presence of submerged prehistoric landscapes and archaeological sites.

Mission

The Institute of Maritime History (IMH) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and documentation of archaeological remains related to maritime history. Incorporated in 1994, and with field operations now in Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Virginia, IMH is engaged in the study and conservation of shipwrecks, historic waterfront structures and landscapes, and submerged prehistoric archaeological sites.

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