Publications

IMH provides free access to all internal publications and digital archaeological reports.

Kingstown Harbour Shipwreck Project

From December 10, 1997, to January 10, 1998, IMH conducted a detailed survey of a historic shipwreck in Kingstown Harbor with the assistance of the Academic Diving Program at Florida State University. The Organization of American States and the government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines supported the expedition to explore and document the archaeological site. This report briefly summarizes the activities of the survey team during the month-long period of examination. During that time, the team collected a significant amount of information regarding the archaeological nature of the site. This data set, which is archived and maintained by IMH, includes measured site and artifact drawings, photographs and video recordings, and detailed notes of surface features. Although the shipwreck remains unidentified, the composition of the site and artifacts recovered suggests that the vessel is French and dates to the late 1770s or early 1780s.

Annabella

This report covers the first maritime archaeology project by IMH in 1995 – the excavation of Annabella, a 19th-century coasting schooner, in Cape Neddick, Maine. The report includes hull and artifact descriptions and analyses, the coasting trade and the cordwood industry during the 19th century in the vicinity of southern Maine, and an analysis of documents that detail the history of Annabella. The coasting schooner Annabella was built at Port Elizabeth, New Jersey, in 1834. Originally constructed as a sloop, the vessel was built specifically for transporting raw materials such as cordwood, brick, coal, and perishables to markets and industries along the northeast United States coast. During its lengthy 50-year career, ownership of Annabella was transferred among numerous merchants in Philadelphia, Plymouth, Boston, and, finally, Cape Neddick, Maine. Beyond repair and no longer fit for service, the vessel was abandoned on October 17, 1885, in the Cape Neddick River. 

IMH Newsletters

You can download IMH newsletters from this page. Newsletters are published sporadically and produced by IMH staff and members. If you would like to contribute or assist with production of future IMH newsletters, please contact David Howe. We are working to publish all previous newsletters back to 1995.